About my blog

The aim of the ITD course (ID4220) at the Delft University of Technology is to provide Design For Interaction Master students with in-depth theoretical and practical interaction design knowledge to help develop future products based on user-product social interaction. ITD proceeds through a sequence of iterations focusing on various aspects of the brief and the design, and culminates in an experiential prototype.


This blog is managed by Walter A. Aprile: please write if you have questions.

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De meningen ge-uit door medewerkers en studenten van de TU Delft en de commentaren die zijn gegeven reflecteren niet perse de mening(en) van de TU Delft. De TU Delft is dan ook niet verantwoordelijk voor de inhoud van hetgeen op de TU Delft weblogs zichtbaar is. Wel vindt de TU Delft het belangrijk - en ook waarde toevoegend - dat medewerkers en studenten op deze, door de TU Delft gefaciliteerde, omgeving hun mening kunnen geven.

Posts in category happy1

Famous last words….

George Sand on Happiness

“One is happy as a result of one’s own efforts, once one knows of the necessary ingredients of happiness — simple tastes, a certain degree of courage, self-denial to a point, love of work, and, above all, a clear conscience. Happiness is no vague dream, of that I now feel certain.”

— George Sand (1804-1876)

With these words we want to conclude our project and hope you (the reader) have enjoyed all that we did, if you have questions do not hesitate to contact us!

Yours happily,

Blogger on behave of Happy1.

The Expo Final Movie

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The Expo! (aka User Test 3b)

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Poster and brochure for the exposition

The visual look and feel of our product is translated into a brochure and poster. The content can be found below in the pictures provided with this post.

Putting on the trimmings!

After we had a talk with the supervisors they expressed that they did not like the fact the screw-heads were showing in the prototype. This remark was very true, we have overlooked the details in order to be ready for our third user test but now we have completed the test we need to dot the ‘i’s.

The first idea was to put filler on the screw-heads and be done with it but we thought about it some more and we came up with an idea that copies the style of the phone and Happiness Meter to the pillar itself. Golden trimmings! At first they are plain aluminum (because brass was too expensive and the profiles were not long enough) but after cutting and bending (and cleaning them) we painted them gold.

Note the now clearly visible language switch on the back of the pillar as well as the room were the laptop stand (and can be used if necessary).

User Test 3! It works!

We love it when a plan comes together!

Going places… User Study 3

We are on our way to test the new prototype for a third time. This time with all the functionality it will have and in the right context, so let’s get going!

Dare to Share

What we found in the theory is that sharing can increase happiness and of course this might create some meaningful interaction with the product. We want the user to go home whit something from the product and a nice story for his or her friends and family.

So we want people to share something, at first we thought about a token or fiche but we liked some old receipt coming out of the front, paired with a lot of noise like an old-fashioned matrix printer.

This is the receipt we made:

This also means we need a way of getting the receipt out of the pillar and into the hands of the user, without presenting the user with more than one receipt and under accompany of a nice low tech mechanical sound.

Still going strong…

Pillar 2.0 in the make

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Here we are building our second pillar. This time it is stabilized and we created more room for all the extra components. There is a wood frame with different compartments inside, providing a place for all the components. Important to us was a suitable place within the pillar for the laptop and the ‘new’ components like the receipt printer and the language switch

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